Categories Archives

You are currently viewing all posts published under Syria.
You can view a PDF of the graphic here

3 Generations’ Syria Intern Luis Rivera-Nesrala will be offering his vision on the importance of regarding the value of Syrian lives as equal to life in the West this Saturday at the Posthuman Glocal Syposium in New York City. He believes that in the West a dangerous narrative has taken hold which relegates Syrian refugees to the status of second-rate humans in an attempt to justify the reluctance of many Western nations to offer humanitarian aid. Rivera-Nesrala’s presentation is entitled, Syrian Refugees: The Other Does Not Exist, and will feature a clip from 3 Generations’ film Three.

Please check out the graphic below that will be presented in conjunction with his talk:

syria-poster-print-version_block_1 syria-poster-print-version_block_2

In conjunction with the New York Posthuman Research Group, New York University is holding its second annual Posthuman Glocal Syposium on the weekend of April 22nd. This year’s conference, titled Posthuman Futures, calls on a wide range of scholars, philosophers and NYU students to come together for a productive two-day dialogue on how we envision the future that comes after humanity in the postanthropocene era.

A complicated topic, posthumanism is an ideological and social movement founded in the philosophical discipline following humanism. While there are a multitude of disciplines that fall under the umbrella of posthumanism, the main idea is that in the future the human race will inevitably evolve to the point where we cease to be human. The looming questions with which each of the subgroups concerns itself is how to achieve the desired state of posthumanism, and what such a society would or must be like.

At its most basic level, posthumanism can be seen as a critique of humanism, the ideology and philosophy that places the human subject at the highest level of importance in the biosphere and universe. The posthuman philosophy seeks to establish a postanthropocentric society, in which all human life, regardless of race, gender, sexuality, etc. is equally as valuable as every other organism and inorganic being.

If you would like to learn more, a link for the conference is here. 

Screen shot 2015-09-08 at 3.53.04 PM

The Syrian refugee crisis is the largest in the world today and one of the biggest since World War Two. 11 million Syrians – nearly half the population – have been displaced and many are seeking asylum across the Middle East and Europe.  An estimated 2 million refugees have crossed the border into Lebanon. Increased security and checkpoints have left 80% of these refugees without legal status.

3 Generations started telling stories from Syria back in 2014 when we filmed interviews with Nasir, Yasmine and Sultan, three Syrian refugees in Jordan. We are proud to continue this important work through our role as a producing partner of the upcoming documentary feature Beyond the Borders. Written and directed by Sophia and Georgia Scott, the film is set in Lebanon along the Syrian border and follows the lives of four Syrian refugees and a German professor fighting for peace and human rights.

Beyond the Borders gains exclusive access to unknown stories in a region that is on the fringes of hell. The Scott Sisters have spent over a year on the borders of Syria documenting the stories behind the news reports. Beyond The Borders will be a reflection of the strange chaotic lives of the people living in the shadow of the Syrian war.

This is the second documentary feature from the Scott sisters. Their first film, In The Shadow of War, followed four teenagers born in Bosnia towards the end of the civil war. The film examines the lasting psychological trauma of growing up in the aftermath of war. Watch the trailer below:

The Scott sisters are currently on location in Lebanon filming and editing. The film will be ready for release in early 2016. Watch this space for more information.

Screen shot 2014-04-17 at 3.23.49 PM

A few months ago, after returning from filming with Syrian refugees in Jordan,  I attended a small Human Rights Watch event where I met Lama Fakih, the Syria and Lebanon researcher at the HRW Beirut offices.  She gave a talk outlining her current projects, missions and goals.  Both my colleague and I were floored by her intriguing stories, her tenacity, and her remarkable eloquence.  Immediately, I knew she had to become part of 3 Generations’ End of Atrocity series, where leaders and activists share their vision for a world free of crimes against humanity.

Unfortunately, Lama’s trip to New York was short, and we didn’t have a chance to film her.  However, I couldn’t let this opportunity get away.  End of Atrocity needed an infusion from an energetic young person who is active in the fight against crimes against humanity.

Using my connections in Beirut, I found a camera crew, a producer, and set a time to interview Lama.  I had no idea how this was going to work, but early in the morning on a Friday in late March, everything came together.  My good friend and talented producer, Joe Mokbel, was on hand at the Human Rights Watch offices in Beirut and, despite Lebanon’s famously atrocious Internet, was able to video-call me using Skype. It was like I was there in the room.  We did a 30 minute interview, the cameraman sent me the files via an online shared server, and we downloaded them here in New York to cut together what I think is a fantastic addition to our series.

Take a look at the result: a powerful two-minute video of Lama Fakih’s vision for a world without atrocity.

Thank you Lama, Joe, and the whole Beirut team.

-Elizabeth Woller

lama

The slight 30 year-old can’t be taller than five feet, with delicate bones and pale skin.  But despite her apparent fragility, Yasmine is about to prove her strength.  She enters the small office where we are meeting for the first time with a timid smile.  We’re in a city in northern Jordan, close to the border, interviewing Syrians who’ve sought refuge from the catastrophic violence that’s engulfed their country.

Yasmine covers her face for our interview.  Her in-laws are still in Syria, and speaking to media puts them at risk for retribution, especially with what she is about to tell us.  Yasmine is from eastern Ghouta, which some will recognize as the location of the horrifying chemical weapons attack that put Bashar Al-Assad’s regime under intense pressure from the international community and the U.S.  Up to 1,700 of victims died in Ghouta on August 21st, 2013, including hundreds of children and babies.  Her own husband was killed by the gas while trying to take a neighbor’s son to the hospital.  Yasmine tries to describe the chaos and death, calling that night “Judgment Day”.  She and her two children escaped the non-stop shelling and managed to find their way to Jordan.

Six months later, she’s still ravaged by grief, but hasn’t allowed herself to be weighed down with anger at the unfairness of her husband’s death.  Instead, every day she goes to work, recording the deaths of refugees family members.  The organization she is part of has amassed a catalog of thousands of deaths, complete with photos of injuries and detailed descriptions of the event.  They aim to collect this evidence so Bashar can be put on trial and will have no way to deny his crimes.  To the hundreds of refugees in Jordan that she’s helped, Yasmine is a blessing.  There is relief in knowing that the deaths of their loved ones are being recorded and acknowledged, and will not be forgotten if their killer is tried.  Despite her own losses, she is helping an entire community cope with theirs.

Help give Yasmine a platform to tell her story.  Donate to our project.

Yasmine cuYasmine

What do you think of when you wake up in the morning?

Me? I don’t even sleep, I don’t sleep. I stay awake all night and when I sleep I wake up very, very tired and all I think of is going back, but I have a sick husband and there aren’t hospitals there. I’m forced to stay here, though I actually can’t stand still here. When I wake up in the morning, I want to explode. That’s my situation in the morning.

Aisha, mother & grandmother from Dara’a, Syria. Her son disappeared into Syrian prison, so she covered her face during our interview to protect him from retribution. We interviewed Aisha as part of our project recording the stories of Syrian refugees.

Aisha, 46, is a Syrian mother and grandmother living in Amman, Jordan.

Aisha, 46, is a Syrian mother and grandmother living in Amman, Jordan.

Nasir- An aspiring actor prior to the war; now paralyzed due to a sniper bullet.

Nasir- An aspiring actor prior to the war; now partially paralyzed due to a sniper bullet.

The Syrian refugee crisis was 2013’s favorite humanitarian headliner: 6.5 million displaced, the Middle East’s coldest winter in 100 years, dozens of underfed and unequipped camps. As death tallies and displaced persons estimates sky rocket, however, numbers have begun to lose meaning. What does a country look like when nearly one third of its population has been displaced? What does it feel like to be without a home?

Coverage of the Syrian conflict has been extensive but as the media endeavors to provide comprehensive coverage of the issue, suffering becomes quantified and we lose sense of what the conflict means to the people most affected by it. In essence, we forget to see Syrians as humans. Last week, our colleague, Elizabeth Woller, traveled to Jordan to film the stories of Syrian refugees now living in Jordan. When she returns, we will piece these stories into a short film that will aim to depict humanity, joy and community in the lives of five refugees. Take a look at her daily notes to see how things are going-

Day 1

We finally got some internet access and I’m now prepping for tomorrow morning. We’re leaving around 9 to go up to a town in the north call Mafraq where we will interview an injured FSA (Free Syrian Army) fighter in the desert. He has to get a pass to leave the hospital and we only have 2 hours with him, so we’ll see what we can get!

We met the camera operator today. He knows what we are looking for and seems creative. Anyways, gotta go!

Day 2- First Interview

We had a great shoot today.  We picked up Sultan, a Free Syrian Army fighter from a hospital about an hour outside of Amman.  He was shot in the leg three times and is now in a hospital near the Syrian border where he was taken after spending time in a field hospital.  He badly needs surgery; he has external plates on his leg and part of the wound is wide open and stuffed with gauze.  He was able to secure a two hour pass and we took him out into the desert, where our sound engineer (Mo) knew an old abandoned stable where someone once kept their goats.  It was a lot of broken down concrete buildings with an open roof.  He sat on some stairs in front of a door frame, so we could see the sky and the white walls.

Sultan was super charismatic, detailed and emotional while he told his story.  We didn’t have to ask too many question because he answered them all in a beautiful way with little prompting.  A total natural.  He’s also very good looking with light, light green eyes that we contrasted against the sky.  I think we could make a full film just from him.  We bought him a carton of cigarettes to thank him and it was a lot of work to get him to accept them.  He truly has a unique and generous personality.  He used the word “karama” a lot, which means dignity.  A lot of people use that word to talk about Syrians here, because they have lost of much of their dignity.  They’re living in squalid conditions and are completely dependent on the government, organizations, and the good will of others for their most basic needs.

Tomorrow we’ll shoot in the apartment of a family of refugees.  We will interview a grandmother who serves as the matriarch, a daughter who has lost her husband and her four-year old who has lost his father.  She also has a 1-year old baby.  The four-year old is traumatized by his father’s death, telling his mom he wants to be buried and he wants to kill her so they can be with his father.  I don’t know what we will get from him, but our local fixer and translator Maha knows him very well so I’m hoping he will talk to us.

Day 2- Second Interview

Today was very hard. We interviewed Um Ali, a 48 year old mother of a 6 year old, as well as the grandmother of a 4 year old and a 1 year old. They are the children of her 22 year old daughter, whose husband was killed fighting in the revolution. The 4 year old has major trauma and is asking to be killed and buried to be with his father. The 6 year old tortures him by asking where his father is, and through his mother, Um Ali, has become obsessed with watching videos on YouTube showing torture and killing in Syria.

Um Ali veiled her face for the interview because one of her sons was arrested 1.5 years ago and has been missing since. She fears he could be killed if she is seen speaking out. Her son was in the prison that was in the news last week for having killed 11,000 detainees during the course of the conflict. Human Rights Watch called the family today and said his name will be on the list that they present at Geneva, as they seek confirmation of detainments and deaths.

Um Ali started the interview with an almost inaudible voice, but grew increasingly emotional and upset throughout. Although we could only see her eyes, it was very moving. She then interviewed her six-year old son about what he misses about Syria, what he thinks is happening, what he things is going to happen, etc. He told some remarkable stories and made some very strong and touching statements.

The rest of the family declined to be on camera out of fear of retribution for their brother. Tomorrow we will talk with Nasir; a 22 year old aspiring actor who was paralyzed by a sniper.

Day 3- Third interview

Today we started late because Nasir doesn’t wake up until 11 or so. He’s staying with two friends in Amman in a small apartment, and most days doesn’t leave his twin bed in the room he shares with two others. He was paralyzed by a sniper’s bullet in his hometown of Dara’a last year. Before the Syrian civil conflict, he was an aspiring actor who started acting with a folkloric group and unexpectedly won a major role in a local play.

The house is cloudy with cigarette smoke when we arrive. Nasir is in the bedroom with three friends, two who were fellow former Free Syria Army fighters, and one who ahd been a nurse in a field hospital. We have to ask him to move into the living room onto a couch. After a year he has recovered enough that he can use crutches instead of a wheelchair, but he still struggles to get from place to place. His legs are visibly atrophied, and I’m told he is no longer able to afford physical therapy. His depression is obvious as soon as he settles onto the couch. He self-consciously hides the catheter bag that is plainly a source of embarrassment. In spite of his physical and mental pain, he smiles confidently and turns out to be a natural on camera. He has clear skin and sleek features that make him almost more beautiful on the monitor than he is in life.

We start out with general questions, asking about his country, the people, the revolution. Slowly I move into more personal questions. His responses sound rehearsed and I can see him catching himself as he answers. Our sound guy turns to me and whispers, “He’s not being honest.” I make him go through three takes just talking about his acting. He’s finally on a roll, getting more open and emotional and we turn the subject to the painful history we’re dancing around. He drops his professional voice. He goes in depth about his injury, how it affects how people treat him, what it’s like to be dependent on others for your care. I don’t understand everything he’s saying but the bits I catch are heartbreaking. He says that when he arrived in Jordan, he expected to be ignored by his Jordanian neighbors who don’t want Syrians in their neighborhoods. Instead he was greeted with open arms, food, care, offers of assistance. I ask if he’s happy. He says there is still happiness inside of him, but melancholy overcomes his face as soon as I ask the question. We wrap the interview, with everyone in a quiet mood. We do our “video portrait” shots and take b-roll. His friends sing and make coffee in the kitchen, joking loudly that he does nothing to help them. It’s clear they care for each other a great deal.

Our medicine partners order finasterideZithromax online pharmacyValacyclovir no prescription Here you can find useful information.
© 3Generations. All rights. reserved.